Technical Videos
Making the Point
Pointing brickwork the traditional way
Framing Opinions
Protecting our legacy of traditional windows
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Making the Point
Pointing brickwork the traditional way
Pointing or repointing, the art of filling or refilling the joints between bricks and stones with mortar, is a skill which is vital in ensuring both the delightful appearance, and even more importantly, the structural stability of an old wall. It is a skill, however, which has been taken for granted for too long - and which many practitioners have completely lost.
Getting the mortar mix wrong, or using the wrong techniques to apply the mortar, can result in a visual mess, the rapid deterioration of the wall, and ultimately a big repair bill.
There are over 1.5 million miles of pointing in Britain's old buildings today - enough to go round the world 64 times. And £8 million is spent each year in the UK on repointing.
This video provides a basic outline of how to make lime mortar the right way, the traditional way, and a step-by-step guide to the techniques of repointing an average brick wall. Devised as part of English Heritage's Making the Point campaign, it aims both to educate professionals to use traditional, benign techniques and materials, and to educate home owners about correct methods of mortar mixing and pointing to enable them to commission and supervise repointing work.

Suitability:
professionals involved in executing or specifying repointing of brick or stonework; home owners; college and university building- related courses; adult education; 30 minutes; 1994.
Produced by Alan McPherson English Heritage

English Heritage
C/O
Liner Rolpanit Incorporated North America
430 Montrose Ave. Toronto,
Ontario, Canada M6G 3H1
(416) 534-1511
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Framing Opinions
Protecting our legacy of traditional windows
Old windows add to the historic and financial value of a house, and they don't have to be incompatible with modern living.
There are 40 million old windows in Britain today. Each of them has its own, fascinating history, which not only enhances the character of the home but can also be used to help date the building. Yet today historic windows - which do so much to give our historic towns and villages a unique sense of identity - are at risk from unnecessary replacement. Installing replacement windows can result in a visual mess, in structural damage and a reduction in the value of the house.
English Heritage's Framing Opinions campaign has been designed to promote the repair and upgrading of traditional windows, rather than their wholesale replacement. Where replacement is unavoidable, it champions faithful replication.
This video looks at the history of the sash window - the principal window type from 1700 to 1950. It examines the factors involved in making the right decisions for windows - decisions which will not only save money and help to retain the old fabric of the building, but, in keeping local craftspeople in business, can also be the greener option.

Suitability:
GCSE; 6th Form; teacher training; colleges and universities (building-related courses0; adult education. 1994; 26 minutes; produced by the Centre for Educational Resources for the Construction Industry.
English Heritage
English Heritage is England's national body responsible for heritage conservation. For more information about the Framing Opinions campaign, please contact:

English Heritage
C/O
Liner Rolpanit Incorporated North America
430 Montrose Ave. Toronto,
Ontario, Canada M6G 3H1
(416) 534-1511
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